Skip to main content

Graduate Course Information

Spring 2019

For a complete listing of Graduate Philosophy courses, click here.

Course #      Course Title Instructor
PHI 618 Hegel, Marx & Nietzsche

Baynes

PHI 622 20th Century French/German Philosophy

Lambert

PHI 687 Language/Epistemology/Mind/Metaphysics

Edwards

PHI 730 Seminar in Modern Philosophy 

Beiser 

PHI 750 Seminar in Current Philosophical Problems Anderson
PHI 840 Seminar in Metaphysics McDaniel
PHI 860 Seminar in Ethics - Motivation Paakkunainen

Class descriptions forthcoming

 

FALL 2018

For a complete listing of Graduate Philosophy courses, click here.

Course #      Course Title Instructor
PHI 651 Logic and Language

Rieppel

PHI 693 Proseminar: Moral and Political Philosophy

Bradley/Sobel

PHI 750.1 Sem. in Current Phil. Problems: Philosophy of Mind - Central and Recent Issues on Consciousness 

Van Gullick

PHI 750.2 Sem. in Current Phil. Problems: The Metaphysics of Ethics 

Bradley/McDaniel 

PHI 750.3 Sem. in Current Phil. Problems:  Philosophy of Action Frost
PHI 880/PSC 880 Sem. in Social & Political Philosophy: Justice & Equality Baynes

Class Descriptions

PHI 651 - Logic and Language

Instructor: Michael Rieppel

TTH 9:30 - 10:50 

The aim of this course is to provide students with a background in various concepts, methods, and results from mathematical logic that are of philosophical importance. Topics that we will cover include basic set theory, topics in the model- and proof-theory of propositional logic, first-order logic, and modal logic, and applications of formal techniques to the study of meaning in natural language.

This course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students, and will move at a fairly rapid pace. Undergraduates must have taken PHI 251 or an equivalent introductory logic course; additional background in logic, mathematics, or relevant areas of philosophy is beneficial.

 

PHI 693 - Proseminar: Moral and Political Philosophy

Instructors: Ben Bradley/David Sobel

T 3:30 - 6:15

This course covers topics in normative ethics, metaethics, and political philosophy, focusing on relatively contemporary material. By design the course is a rather rushed introduction to a few selected topics in recent moral and political thought rather than either an in depth investigation into a single topic or an attempt to canvas the entire range of topics in contemporary moral and political philosophy. The course is designed to prepare students for further graduate coursework in ethics and political philosophy. There will be regular writing assignments and a substantial term paper.

 

PHI 750.1 - Seminar in Current Philosophical Problems: Philosophy of Mind Central and Recent Issues on Consciousness

Instructor: Robert Van Gulick

M  3:45 - 6:30

Central and recent issues of Consciousness.  Critical examination of some central issues of consciousness with the focus on new and recently published literature.  Topics will include current neuro-cognitive theories of consciousness, the unity of consciousness, cognitive phenomenality and phenomenal intentionality – and possibly animal consciousness, panpsychism, and illusionism.

 

PHI 750.2 - Seminar in Current Philosophical Problems: The Metaphysics of Ethics

Instructors: Ben Bradley/Kris McDaniel

W  2:15 - 5:00

Philosophers sometimes make use of metaphysical theses to defend, undermine, or articulate ethical theses. This course will look at some recent literature with this feature. We will look at how metaphysical views about identity, vagueness, time, and causation are appealed to in ethical arguments. The last several weeks will be spent on Matti Eklund’s recent book on normative concepts.

 

PHI 750.3 - Seminar in Current Philosophical Problems: Philosophy of Action
Instructor: Kim Frost
W  5:15 - 8:00

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of action, with a focus on critique of the idea that there is a “will” that is the source of all voluntary, intentional, rational, and distinctively human action. Questions we shall address include the following: What is it to do something voluntarily, or deliberately, or intentionally? What's the difference between intentional actions and things we do involuntarily, or accidentally, or unintentionally, or automatically? How is it that when we are doing something intentionally, we usually know what we are doing, and what our reasons are for doing it, without having to look and see? What is it to have reasons for action? Is it to have certain beliefs and desires, or something more (or other) than that? What is it to act for a reason? Is it just for one’s body to be caused to move by one's mental states, or is it something more (or other) than that? What is intention? Is it a mental state, with a distinctive causal role, or something else?

 

PHI 880/PSC 880 - Seminar in Social & Political Philosophy: Justice and Equality
Instructor: Kenneth Baynes

TH  3:30 - 6:15

The seminar will explore various topics in current (i.e., “post-Rawlsian”) discussions about justice and equality.  These may include a review of discussions concerning the appropriate metric of equality—should egalitarians be primarily concerned with welfare, resources, capabilities or the opportunity for one or another of these; debates between distributive and relational accounts of equality (including “luck egalitarianism” and the relational accounts of Elizabeth Anderson, Axel Honneth, and others); debates about the place of individual responsibility and desert in accounts of social justice; egalitarianism and global justice; and (depending on interest) recent debates about conflicts between religious liberty and equality (as in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby) as well as questions about state neutrality and whether religion is “special”—that is, deserves accommodation by the state and/or exemption from state regulation.